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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 873197, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/873197
Research Article

Neural Rhythms of Change: Long-Term Improvement after Successful Treatment in Children with Disruptive Behavior Problems

1Educational Psychology, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
2Applied Psychology and Human Development, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 2J7
3Rotman Research Institute, The Baycrest Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada M6A 2E1
4Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University, 6500 HE Nijmegen, Netherlands

Received 9 April 2015; Revised 13 June 2015; Accepted 15 June 2015

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2015 Steven Woltering et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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