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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 968970, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/968970
Research Article

Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Effects on Saccade Adaptation

1Department of Neuroscience, Erasmus MC, 3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands
2Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, 84105 Beer-Sheva, Israel
3Erasmus University College, 3011 HP Rotterdam, Netherlands

Received 8 January 2015; Accepted 6 February 2015

Academic Editor: Małgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2015 Eric Avila et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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