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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2015, Article ID 972791, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/972791
Review Article

Zinc in Gut-Brain Interaction in Autism and Neurological Disorders

1Zinpro Corporation, Eden Prairie, MN 55344, USA
2Autismo ABP, 64639 Monterrey, NL, Mexico
3WG Molecular Analysis of Synaptopathies, Neurology Department, Neurocenter of Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany
4Institute for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Ulm University, 89081 Ulm, Germany

Received 2 February 2015; Accepted 5 March 2015

Academic Editor: Richard Dyck

Copyright © 2015 Guillermo Vela et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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