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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1678390, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1678390
Research Article

Visual Timing of Structured Dance Movements Resembles Auditory Rhythm Perception

Department of Movement Science, Faculty of Sport and Health Sciences, Technical University of Munich, 80992 Munich, Germany

Received 2 September 2015; Revised 29 January 2016; Accepted 14 April 2016

Academic Editor: Francesca Frassinetti

Copyright © 2016 Yi-Huang Su and Elvira Salazar-López. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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