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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 1686414, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1686414
Research Article

Effects of a Single Session of High Intensity Interval Treadmill Training on Corticomotor Excitability following Stroke: Implications for Therapy

1Department of Physical Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA
2Department of Exercise Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Received 16 May 2016; Revised 13 July 2016; Accepted 26 July 2016

Academic Editor: Sheng Li

Copyright © 2016 Sangeetha Madhavan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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