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Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2473081, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2473081
Review Article

Obesity Reduces Cognitive and Motor Functions across the Lifespan

1Department of Neurology, The Affiliated Shenzhen Nanshan Hospital, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518000, China
2Center for Brain Disorders and Cognitive Neuroscience, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060, China
3Department of Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong
4Department of Neurology, Shenzhen Second People’s Hospital, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518035, China

Received 21 July 2015; Accepted 15 October 2015

Academic Editor: Mauricio Arcos-Burgos

Copyright © 2016 Chuanming Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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