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Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 2701526, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/2701526
Review Article

Role of NMDA Receptor-Mediated Glutamatergic Signaling in Chronic and Acute Neuropathologies

1Laboratorio de Función y Patología Neuronal, Departamento de Biología Celular y Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, 8331150 Santiago, Chile
2Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 19 February 2016; Revised 13 June 2016; Accepted 29 June 2016

Academic Editor: Kui D. Kang

Copyright © 2016 Francisco J. Carvajal et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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