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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3597209, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3597209
Review Article

Neuroinflammation in Autism: Plausible Role of Maternal Inflammation, Dietary Omega 3, and Microbiota

1Ann Romney Center for Neurologic Diseases, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2Nutrition et Neurobiologie Intégrée, UMR 1286, INRA, 33000 Bordeaux, France
3Nutrition et Neurobiologie Intégrée, UMR 1286, Bordeaux University, 33000 Bordeaux, France
4Inserm, U1141, Hôpital Robert Debré, Paris, France
5Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France
6Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada
7Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada
8Département de Biologie, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université de Lyon, UCB Lyon 1, Lyon, France
9OptiNutriBrain International Associated Laboratory (NutriNeuro France-INAF Canada), Bordeaux, France

Received 30 May 2016; Revised 24 August 2016; Accepted 27 September 2016

Academic Editor: Bruno Poucet

Copyright © 2016 Charlotte Madore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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