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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 3616807, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3616807
Review Article

Transcranial Alternating Current and Random Noise Stimulation: Possible Mechanisms

1Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, University Medical Center, 37073 Göttingen, Germany
2Experimental Psychology Lab, Department of Psychology, Center for Excellence “Hearing4all”, European Medical School, Carl von Ossietzky University, 26111 Oldenburg, Germany
3Research Center Neurosensory Science, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany

Received 4 January 2016; Accepted 3 April 2016

Academic Editor: Volker Tronnier

Copyright © 2016 Andrea Antal and Christoph S. Herrmann. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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