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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 4072402, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4072402
Research Article

Compensation through Functional Hyperconnectivity: A Longitudinal Connectome Assessment of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA
2Department of Computer Science, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA
3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA
4Department of Emergency Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA
5Department of Radiology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA

Received 7 May 2015; Revised 7 August 2015; Accepted 11 August 2015

Academic Editor: Shuyu Li

Copyright © 2016 Armin Iraji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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