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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4783836, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4783836
Research Article

Inhibition of DNA Methylation Impairs Synaptic Plasticity during an Early Time Window in Rats

1Department of Pathology and Physiology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valparaíso, 2341386 Valparaíso, Chile
2Interdisciplinary Center for Innovation in Health (CIIS), University of Valparaíso, 8380492 Valparaíso, Chile
3Institute of Physiology I, Systemic and Cellular Neuroscience, Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg, 79104 Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany
4CINV-Universidad de Valparaíso, 2360102 Valparaíso, Chile
5Instituto de Biología, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, 3100000 Valparaíso, Chile

Received 4 April 2016; Revised 10 June 2016; Accepted 15 June 2016

Academic Editor: James M. Wyss

Copyright © 2016 Pablo Muñoz et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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