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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 4806492, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/4806492
Research Article

Maladaptive Plasticity in Aphasia: Brain Activation Maps Underlying Verb Retrieval Errors

1Rijndam Rehabilitation Institute, P.O. Box 23181, 3001 KD Rotterdam, Netherlands
2Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands
3Centre de Recherche de l’Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, 4565 Chemin Queen-Mary, Montréal, QC, Canada H3W 1W5
4École d’Orthophonie et d’Audiologie, Université de Montréal, 7077 Avenue du Parc, Montréal, QC, Canada H3N 1X7

Received 16 November 2015; Revised 25 April 2016; Accepted 5 May 2016

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2016 Kerstin Spielmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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