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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 5098591, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5098591
Research Article

Individual Differences in Behavioural Despair Predict Brain GSK-3beta Expression in Mice: The Power of a Modified Swim Test

1Department of Neuroscience, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Universiteitssingel 40, 6229 ER Maastricht, Netherlands
2Laboratory of Biomolecular Screening, Institute of Physiologically Active Compounds, Russian Academy of Sciences, Severnii Proezd 1, Chernogolovka, Moscow 142432, Russia
3Laboratory of Cognitive Dysfunctions, Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Baltiiskaya Street 8, Moscow 125315, Russia
4Department of Physiology, Federal State Budgetary Scientific Institution “Institute of Experimental Medicine”, Akademika Pavlova Street 12, Saint-Petersburg 197022, Russia
5Department of Human Anatomy, I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Mokhovaya Street 11-10, Moscow 125009, Russia
6Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Laboratory of Translational Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University of Wuerzburg, Fuechsleinstrasse 15, 97080 Wuerzburg, Germany

Received 15 February 2016; Revised 9 May 2016; Accepted 18 May 2016

Academic Editor: Divya Mehta

Copyright © 2016 Tatyana Strekalova et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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