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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 5961362, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5961362
Research Article

Multisession Anodal tDCS Protocol Improves Motor System Function in an Aging Population

1Centre de Recherche de l’Hôpital du Sacré-Cœur de Montréal, 5400 boulevard Gouin Ouest, Montréal, QC, Canada H4J 1C5
2Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, 100 rue Sherbrooke Ouest, Montréal, QC, Canada H2X 3P2
3Unité de Neuroimagerie Fonctionnelle, Centre de Recherche de l’Institut de Gériatrie de Montréal, 4545 chemin Queen-Mary, Montréal, QC, Canada H3W 1W4
4Département de Psychologie, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
5Département de Psychologie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, 3600 rue Sainte-Marguerite, Trois-Rivières, QC, Canada G8Z 1X3

Received 2 September 2015; Revised 17 November 2015; Accepted 22 November 2015

Academic Editor: Jyoti Mishra

Copyright © 2016 G. Dumel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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