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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6827135, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6827135
Review Article

Placental, Matrilineal, and Epigenetic Mechanisms Promoting Environmentally Adaptive Development of the Mammalian Brain

Institute for Women’s Health, University College London, 74 Huntley Street, London WC1N 6HX, UK

Received 14 November 2015; Accepted 3 March 2016

Academic Editor: Stuart C. Mangel

Copyright © 2016 Kevin D. Broad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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