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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 6846721, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6846721
Research Article

A Dietary Treatment Improves Cerebral Blood Flow and Brain Connectivity in Aging apoE4 Mice

1Department of Anatomy, Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition & Behaviour, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands
2Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands
3Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands
4Institute for Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Pharmacology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany
5Nutricia Research, Advanced Medical Nutrition, Utrecht, Netherlands
6UIPS, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands

Received 8 January 2016; Accepted 22 February 2016

Academic Editor: Tae-Jin Kim

Copyright © 2016 Maximilian Wiesmann et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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