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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 6979435, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/6979435
Research Article

A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis Reveal BDNF Val66Met Is a Possible Risk Factor for PTSD

1School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI), 60 Musk Avenue, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, QLD 4059, Australia
2Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation, Greenslopes Private Hospital, Newdegate Street, Greenslopes, QLD 4120, Australia

Received 17 March 2016; Accepted 15 May 2016

Academic Editor: Andreas Menke

Copyright © 2016 Dagmar Bruenig et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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