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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7123609, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7123609
Research Article

Stepping in Place While Voluntarily Turning Around Produces a Long-Lasting Posteffect Consisting in Inadvertent Turning While Stepping Eyes Closed

1Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri (IRCCS), Centro Studi Attività Motorie, Via Salvatore Maugeri 10, 27100 Pavia, Italy
2Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Via Forlanini 2, 27100 Pavia, Italy

Received 13 April 2016; Revised 20 June 2016; Accepted 3 July 2016

Academic Editor: Prithvi Shah

Copyright © 2016 Stefania Sozzi and Marco Schieppati. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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