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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7692602, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7692602
Review Article

Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Processes after Spinal Cord Injury: The Case of the Bulbospinal Respiratory Neurons

1PPSN EA 4674, Aix-Marseille Université, 13013 Marseille, France
2INMED UMR 901, INSERM, Aix-Marseille Université, 13273 Marseille, France

Received 12 February 2016; Accepted 29 June 2016

Academic Editor: Kui D. Kang

Copyright © 2016 Anne Kastner and Valéry Matarazzo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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