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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 7694385, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7694385
Research Article

Neuregulin-1 Regulates Cortical Inhibitory Neuron Dendrite and Synapse Growth through DISC1

1Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1
2Department of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1

Received 16 April 2016; Revised 5 July 2016; Accepted 5 September 2016

Academic Editor: Andreas M. Grabrucker

Copyright © 2016 Brianna K. Unda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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