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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 7971460, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/7971460
Review Article

Deep Brain Stimulation for Obesity: From a Theoretical Framework to Practical Application

Department of Neurosurgery, Division of Functional Neurosurgery, Allegheny General Hospital, 320 E. North Avenue, Suite 302, Pittsburgh, PA 15212, USA

Received 22 April 2015; Accepted 14 July 2015

Academic Editor: Mauricio Arcos-Burgos

Copyright © 2016 Raj K. Nangunoori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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