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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8032180, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8032180
Research Article

Neural Correlates of Dual-Task Walking: Effects of Cognitive versus Motor Interference in Young Adults

1Research Focus Cognition Sciences, Division of Training and Movement Sciences, University of Potsdam, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
2Geriatric Center at the University of Heidelberg, Agaplesion Bethanien Hospital, 69126 Heidelberg, Germany
3Department of Sports Psychology, Institute of Sports Science, University of Mainz, 55122 Mainz, Germany
4Division of Sport and Exercise Psychology, University of Potsdam, 14469 Potsdam, Germany
5Department of Sports Science, Sport Psychology, University of Konstanz, 78464 Konstanz, Germany

Received 9 December 2015; Accepted 31 March 2016

Academic Editor: Terry McMorris

Copyright © 2016 Rainer Beurskens et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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