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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8181393, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8181393
Research Article

Altered Cerebellar Circuitry following Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury in Adult Rats

1Department of Biomedical Sciences, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614, USA
2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center, Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA

Received 7 May 2016; Accepted 20 June 2016

Academic Editor: Bae H. Lee

Copyright © 2016 Nishant P. Visavadiya and Joe E. Springer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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