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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 8301737, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8301737
Review Article

Emerging Roles of BAI Adhesion-GPCRs in Synapse Development and Plasticity

1Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
2Integrative Molecular and Biomedical Sciences Program, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3Verna and Marrs McLean Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA

Received 14 July 2015; Revised 6 October 2015; Accepted 12 October 2015

Academic Editor: Lin Xu

Copyright © 2016 Joseph G. Duman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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