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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 8742725, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8742725
Research Article

Background Noise Contributes to Organic Solvent Induced Brain Dysfunction

1Cell & Molecular Pathology Laboratory, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA
2Loma Linda VA Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA, USA
3Head & Neck Surgery, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA, USA
4Naval Medical Research Unit and Molecular Bioeffects, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, OH, USA

Received 19 August 2015; Accepted 22 December 2015

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2016 O’neil W. Guthrie et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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