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Volume 2016, Article ID 8926840, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8926840
Research Article

Emotion Dysregulation and Inflammation in African-American Women with Type 2 Diabetes

1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Jesse Hill Jr. Drive, Atlanta, GA 30306, USA
2Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
3College of Nursing & College of Medicine (Psychiatry), University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
4Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA
5Center for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Research, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA
6Atlanta VA Medical Center, Atlanta, GA, USA

Received 10 February 2016; Revised 3 May 2016; Accepted 5 June 2016

Academic Editor: Stefan Kloiber

Copyright © 2016 Abigail Powers et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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