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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9028126, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9028126
Research Article

Long-Standing Motor and Sensory Recovery following Acute Fibrin Sealant Based Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Repair

1Department of Tropical Diseases, Botucatu Medical School, São Paulo State University (UNESP), 18618-000 Botucatu, SP, Brazil
2Center for the Study of Venoms and Venomous Animals (CEVAP), São Paulo State University (UNESP), 18610-307 Botucatu, SP, Brazil
3Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Institute of Biology, University of Campinas, 13083-970 Campinas, SP, Brazil

Received 5 February 2016; Revised 3 May 2016; Accepted 17 May 2016

Academic Editor: Michele Fornaro

Copyright © 2016 Natalia Perussi Biscola et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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