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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 9265621, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9265621
Review Article

MRI Biomarkers for Hand-Motor Outcome Prediction and Therapy Monitoring following Stroke

1Functional Imaging Unit, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology, University Medicine, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany
2Department of Neurology, University Medicine, University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany

Received 12 July 2016; Accepted 23 August 2016

Academic Editor: Lijun Bai

Copyright © 2016 U. Horn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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