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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9696402, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9696402
Research Article

Inhibition Plasticity in Older Adults: Practice and Transfer Effects Using a Multiple Task Approach

1Department of Psychology, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3
2Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3G8

Received 21 August 2015; Revised 24 October 2015; Accepted 27 October 2015

Academic Editor: Jyoti Mishra

Copyright © 2016 Andrea J. Wilkinson and Lixia Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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