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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9803165, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9803165
Research Article

Functional Integration between Salience and Central Executive Networks: A Role for Action Video Game Experience

1Key Laboratory for NeuroInformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China
2ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and Its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney 2109, NSW, Australia

Received 27 April 2015; Revised 2 September 2015; Accepted 2 September 2015

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2016 Diankun Gong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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