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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9815092, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9815092
Research Article

Correlations between the Memory-Related Behavior and the Level of Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Mice Brain, Provoked by an Acute Administration of CB Receptor Ligands

1Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacodynamics, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 4a Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
2Department of Medical Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 4a Street, 20-093 Lublin, Poland
3Department of Mathematics and Medical Biostatistics, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4 Street, 20-954 Lublin, Poland

Received 17 July 2015; Revised 19 September 2015; Accepted 29 September 2015

Academic Editor: Etienne de Villers-Sidani

Copyright © 2016 Marta Kruk-Slomka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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