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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2016, Article ID 9828517, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/9828517
Research Article

Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex

1Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College, 7 Kopernika Street, 31-034 Krakow, Poland
2Department of Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, 3 Pasteur Street, 02-093 Warsaw, Poland
3Department of Cell Biology and Imaging, Institute of Zoology, Jagiellonian University, 9 Gronostajowa Street, 30-387 Krakow, Poland
4University of Social Sciences and Humanities, 19/31 Chodakowska Street, 03-815 Warsaw, Poland

Received 19 June 2015; Revised 31 August 2015; Accepted 14 September 2015

Academic Editor: Bryen A. Jordan

Copyright © 2016 Malgorzata Jasinska et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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