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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1473783, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1473783
Research Article

Thalamo-Sensorimotor Functional Connectivity Correlates with World Ranking of Olympic, Elite, and High Performance Athletes

1Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Z 7K4
2Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Z 7K4
3Swimming Canada, Calgary, AB, Canada T2P 3C5
4Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, China
5Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310015, China
6Graduate Institute of Humanities in Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
7Brain and Consciousness Research Center, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan

Correspondence should be addressed to Zirui Huang; moc.liamg@gnauh.iuriz.rd, Henry (Hap) Davis IV; moc.liamg@sivadpah, and Georg Northoff; ac.layoreht@ffohtron.groeg

Received 5 October 2016; Accepted 11 January 2017; Published 2 February 2017

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2017 Zirui Huang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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