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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 1612078, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1612078
Research Article

Cognitive Pragmatic Rehabilitation Program in Schizophrenia: A Single Case fMRI Study

1Faculty of Humanities, Research Unit of Logopedics, Child Language Research Center, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland
2Center for Cognitive Science (CSC), University and Polytechnic of Turin, Turin, Italy
3Department of Psychology, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
4Neuroscience Institute of Turin, Turin, Italy
5Brain Imaging Group (BIG), Koelliker Hospital, Turin, Italy
6Psychiatric Service, Mental Health Department, ASL-TO3, Turin, Italy
7CCS fMRI, Koelliker Hospital, Turin, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Francesca M. Bosco; ti.otinu@ocsob.acsecnarf

Received 20 July 2016; Revised 4 November 2016; Accepted 7 December 2016; Published 23 January 2017

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2017 Ilaria Gabbatore et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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