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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2361691, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2361691
Research Article

Intrahemispheric Perfusion in Chronic Stroke-Induced Aphasia

1Center for the Neurobiology of Language Recovery, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
2Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, School of Communication, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
3Department of Neurology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
4Department of Radiology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA
5Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
6Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing, College of Health & Rehabilitation, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA
7Department of Cognitive Science, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA
8Department of Psychology, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Cynthia K. Thompson; ude.nretsewhtron@mohtkc

Received 30 September 2016; Revised 17 January 2017; Accepted 26 January 2017; Published 5 March 2017

Academic Editor: Zygmunt Galdzicki

Copyright © 2017 Cynthia K. Thompson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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