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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 2545736, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2545736
Review Article

Enhancing Plasticity of the Central Nervous System: Drugs, Stem Cell Therapy, and Neuro-Implants

1ToNIC, Toulouse NeuroImaging Center, Université de Toulouse, Inserm, UPS, Toulouse, France
2Radiopharmacy Department, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France
3LAAS-CNRS, Université de Toulouse, CNRS, INSA, UPS, Toulouse, France
4Nuclear Medicine Department, CHU Toulouse, Toulouse, France

Correspondence should be addressed to Isabelle Loubinoux; rf.mresni@xuonibuol.ellebasi

Received 7 June 2017; Revised 19 September 2017; Accepted 23 October 2017; Published 17 December 2017

Academic Editor: Zhong-Ping Feng

Copyright © 2017 Alice Le Friec et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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