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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 3162087, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/3162087
Research Article

Learning “How to Learn”: Super Declarative Motor Learning Is Impaired in Parkinson’s Disease

1Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation, Ophthalmology, Genetics, Maternal and Child Health, University of Genova, Genova, Italy
2Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genova, Italy
3Neurology Unit, Policlinico Umberto I, Department of Neurology and Psichiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
4Academic Neurology Unit, A. Fiorini Hospital, Terracina (LT), Department of Medical-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Italy
5Department of Physiology, Pharmacology & Neuroscience, CUNY School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Lucio Marinelli; ti.eginu@illeniram.oicul

Received 30 April 2017; Accepted 9 July 2017; Published 30 July 2017

Academic Editor: Rajnish Chaturvedi

Copyright © 2017 Lucio Marinelli et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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