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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4050536, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4050536
Research Article

White Matter Hyperintensity Load Modulates Brain Morphometry and Brain Connectivity in Healthy Adults: A Neuroplastic Mechanism?

1Department of Neuroscience, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
2Functional MR, S.Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Science (DIBINEM), Bologna, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Matteo De Marco; ku.ca.dleiffehs@ocramed.m

Received 30 March 2017; Accepted 3 July 2017; Published 3 August 2017

Academic Editor: J. Michael Wyss

Copyright © 2017 Matteo De Marco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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