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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 4526417, 11 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4526417
Research Article

Brain-Specific SNAP-25 Deletion Leads to Elevated Extracellular Glutamate Level and Schizophrenia-Like Behavior in Mice

1School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China
2Shanghai Engineering Research Center of Model Organisms (SRCMO/SMOC), Shanghai 201203, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Jian Fei; nc.ude.ijgnot@iefj

Received 29 June 2017; Revised 31 August 2017; Accepted 15 October 2017; Published 28 November 2017

Academic Editor: Depei Li

Copyright © 2017 Hua Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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