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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 4653256, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/4653256
Research Article

Motor Imagery Impairment in Postacute Stroke Patients

1Neuropsychology Lab, Department of Psychology, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
2Kliniken Schmieder Allensbach, Allensbach, Germany
3Kliniken Schmieder Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany
4Research Center Neurosensory Science, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany
5Cluster of Excellence Hearing4All, University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany

Correspondence should be addressed to Niclas Braun

Received 9 December 2016; Accepted 14 February 2017; Published 28 March 2017

Academic Editor: Malgorzata Kossut

Copyright © 2017 Niclas Braun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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