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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 5101925, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/5101925
Clinical Study

A Longitudinal fMRI Research on Neural Plasticity and Sensory Outcome of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

1Department of Hand Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, 12 Wulumuqi Middle Road, Shanghai 200040, China
2Department of Central Laboratory, Jing’an District Centre Hospital, Shanghai, China
3Department of Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery, Jing’an District Centre Hospital, Shanghai, China
4Key Laboratory of Hand Reconstruction, Ministry of Health, Shanghai, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Mouxiong Zheng; ten.haey@hzgnoixuom and Wendong Xu; moc.361@nahsauh_gnodnewux

Received 25 April 2017; Revised 7 August 2017; Accepted 10 September 2017; Published 16 November 2017

Academic Editor: Rosa A. González-Polo

Copyright © 2017 Hao Ma et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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