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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 6237351, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6237351
Research Article

Proteomic Analysis of HDAC3 Selective Inhibitor in the Regulation of Inflammatory Response of Primary Microglia

1Department of Neurology, Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical school, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210008, China
2The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Meijuan Zhang; moc.361@6216891iznauj

Received 23 September 2016; Revised 27 December 2016; Accepted 12 January 2017; Published 15 February 2017

Academic Editor: Michele Fornaro

Copyright © 2017 Mingxu Xia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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