Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Corrigendum

A corrigendum for this article has been published. To view the corrigendum, please click here.

Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 6724631, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/6724631
Research Article

Short-Term Monocular Deprivation Enhances Physiological Pupillary Oscillations

1Department of Translational Research on New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
2CNR Neuroscience Institute, Pisa, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Claudia Lunghi; moc.liamg@ihgnulalc

Received 28 October 2016; Accepted 18 December 2016; Published 9 January 2017

Academic Editor: Fang Hou

Copyright © 2017 Paola Binda and Claudia Lunghi. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. C. Lunghi, M. Berchicci, M. C. Morrone, and F. Di Russo, “Short-term monocular deprivation alters early components of visual evoked potentials,” The Journal of Physiology, vol. 593, no. 19, pp. 4361–4372, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  2. C. Lunghi, D. C. Burr, and C. Morrone, “Brief periods of monocular deprivation disrupt ocular balance in human adult visual cortex,” Current Biology, vol. 21, no. 14, pp. R538–R539, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  3. C. Lunghi, D. C. Burr, and M. Concetta Morrone, “Long-term effects of monocular deprivation revealed with binocular rivalry gratings modulated in luminance and in color,” Journal of Vision, vol. 13, no. 6, article no. 1, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. C. Lunghi, U. E. Emir, M. C. Morrone, and H. Bridge, “Short-term monocular deprivation alters GABA in the adult human visual cortex,” Current Biology, vol. 25, no. 11, pp. 1496–1501, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. J. Zhou, D. H. Baker, M. Simard, D. Saint-Amour, and R. F. Hess, “Short-term monocular patching boosts the patched eye's response in visual cortex,” Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience, vol. 33, no. 3, pp. 381–387, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. J. Zhou, S. Clavagnier, and R. F. Hess, “Short-term monocular deprivation strengthens the patched eye's contribution to binocular combination,” Journal of Vision, vol. 13, no. 5, article 12, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  7. J. Zhou, A. Reynaud, and R. F. Hess, “Real-time modulation of perceptual eye dominance in humans,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, vol. 281, no. 1795, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  8. D. Alais and R. Blake, Binocular Rivalry, MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass, USA, 2005.
  9. L. Baroncelli, L. Maffei, and A. Sale, “New perspectives in amblyopia therapy on adults: a critical role for the excitatory/inhibitory balance,” Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience, vol. 5, article 25, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  10. M. Fagiolini, J.-M. Fritschy, K. Löw, H. Möhler, U. Rudolph, and T. K. Hensch, “Specific GABAA circuits for visual cortical plasticity,” Science, vol. 303, no. 5664, pp. 1681–1683, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  11. M. Fagiolini and T. K. Hensch, “Inhibitory threshold for critical-period activation in primary visual cortex,” Nature, vol. 404, no. 6774, pp. 183–186, 2000. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. J. A. Heimel, D. van Versendaal, and C. N. Levelt, “The role of GABAergic inhibition in ocular dominance plasticity,” Neural Plasticity, vol. 2011, Article ID 391763, 11 pages, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  13. A. Harauzov, M. Spolidoro, G. DiCristo et al., “Reducing intracortical inhibition in the adult visual cortex promotes ocular dominance plasticity,” Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 30, no. 1, pp. 361–371, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. L. Baroncelli, J. Bonaccorsi, M. Milanese et al., “Enriched experience and recovery from amblyopia in adult rats: impact of motor, social and sensory components,” Neuropharmacology, vol. 62, no. 7, pp. 2388–2397, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  15. A. Sale, J. F. M. Vetencourt, P. Medini et al., “Environmental enrichment in adulthood promotes amblyopia recovery through a reduction of intracortical inhibition,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 679–681, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  16. Y. Fu, M. Kaneko, Y. Tang, A. Alvarez-Buylla, and M. P. Stryker, “A cortical disinhibitory circuit for enhancing adult plasticity,” eLife, vol. 2015, no. 4, Article ID e05558, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  17. J. F. Maya Vetencourt, A. Sale, A. Viegi et al., “The antidepressant fluoxetine restores plasticity in the adult visual cortex,” Science, vol. 320, no. 5874, pp. 385–388, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  18. H. Morishita, J. M. Miwa, N. Heintz, and T. K. Hensch, “Lynx1, a cholinergic brake, limits plasticity in adult visual cortex,” Science, vol. 330, no. 6008, pp. 1238–1240, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. T. Kasamatsu, J. D. Pettigrew, and M. Ary, “Restoration of visual cortical plasticity by local microperfusion of norepinephrine,” Journal of Comparative Neurology, vol. 185, no. 1, pp. 163–181, 1979. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. T. Kasamatsu, J. D. Pettigrew, and M. Ary, “Cortical recovery from effects of monocular deprivation: acceleration with norepinephrine and suppression with 6-hydroxydopamine,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 45, no. 2, pp. 254–266, 1981. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. M. J. McGinley, M. Vinck, J. Reimer et al., “Waking state: rapid variations modulate neural and behavioral responses,” Neuron, vol. 87, no. 6, pp. 1143–1161, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  22. B. Laeng, S. Sirois, and G. Gredebäck, “Pupillometry: a window to the preconscious?” Perspectives on Psychological Science, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 18–27, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  23. I. Loewenfeld, The Pupil: Anatomy, Physiology, and Clinical Applications, Wayne State University Press, Detroit, Miss, USA, 1993.
  24. J. L. Barbur, A. J. Harlow, and A. Sahraie, “Pupillary responses to stimulus structure, colour and movement,” Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, vol. 12, no. 2, pp. 137–141, 1992. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. C.-A. Wang and D. P. Munoz, “A circuit for pupil orienting responses: implications for cognitive modulation of pupil size,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 33, pp. 134–140, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. J. Reimer, E. Froudarakis, C. R. Cadwell, D. Yatsenko, G. H. Denfield, and A. S. Tolias, “Pupil fluctuations track fast switching of cortical states during quiet wakefulness,” Neuron, vol. 84, no. 2, pp. 355–362, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  27. D. Kahneman and J. Beatty, “Pupil diameter and load on memory,” Science, vol. 154, no. 3756, pp. 1583–1585, 1966. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  28. O. Lowenstein, R. Feinberg, and I. E. Loewenfeld, “Pupillary movements during acute and chronic fatigue a new test for the objective evaluation of tiredness,” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 2, no. 2, pp. 138–157, 1963. View at Google Scholar
  29. H. Lüdtke, B. Wilhelm, M. Adler, F. Schaeffel, and H. Wilhelm, “Mathematical procedures in data recording and processing of pupillary fatigue waves,” Vision Research, vol. 38, no. 19, pp. 2889–2896, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  30. B. Wilhelm, H. Wilhelm, H. Lüdtke, P. Streicher, and M. Adler, “Pupillographic assessment of sleepiness in sleep-deprived healthy subjects,” Sleep, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 258–265, 1998. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  31. M. J. McGinley, S. V. David, and D. A. McCormick, “Cortical membrane potential signature of optimal states for sensory signal detection,” Neuron, vol. 87, no. 1, pp. 179–192, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. M. Vinck, R. Batista-Brito, U. Knoblich, and J. A. Cardin, “Arousal and locomotion make distinct contributions to cortical activity patterns and visual encoding,” Neuron, vol. 86, no. 3, pp. 740–754, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. J. Reimer, M. J. McGinley, Y. Liu et al., “Pupil fluctuations track rapid changes in adrenergic and cholinergic activity in cortex,” Nature Communications, vol. 7, Article ID 13289, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  34. E. H. Hess and J. M. Polt, “Pupil size as related to interest value of visual stimuli,” Science, vol. 132, no. 3423, pp. 349–350, 1960. View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. M. Allen, D. Frank, D. S. Schwarzkopf et al., “Unexpected arousal modulates the influence of sensory noise on confidence,” eLife, vol. 5, Article ID e18103, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  36. D. Schnell, L. Arnaud, V. Lemiale, and S. Legriel, “Pupillary hippus in nonconvulsive status epilepticus,” Epileptic Disorders, vol. 14, no. 3, pp. 310–312, 2012. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. M. Centeno, M. Feldmann, N. A. Harrison et al., “Epilepsy causing pupillary hippus: an unusual semiology,” Epilepsia, vol. 52, no. 8, pp. e93–e96, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  38. S. Joshi, Y. Li, R. M. Kalwani, and J. I. Gold, “Relationships between pupil diameter and neuronal activity in the locus coeruleus, colliculi, and cingulate cortex,” Neuron, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 221–234, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. D. Alnæs, M. H. Sneve, T. Espeseth, T. Endestad, S. H. P. van de Pavert, and B. Laeng, “Pupil size signals mental effort deployed during multiple object tracking and predicts brain activity in the dorsal attention network and the locus coeruleus,” Journal of Vision, vol. 14, no. 4, article 1, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. W. Einhäuser, J. Stout, C. Koch, and O. Carter, “Pupil dilation reflects perceptual selection and predicts subsequent stability in perceptual rivalry,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 105, no. 5, pp. 1704–1709, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. J.-M. Hupé, C. Lamirel, and J. Lorenceau, “Pupil dynamics during bistable motion perception,” Journal of Vision, vol. 9, no. 7, article 10, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. P. Binda, M. Pereverzeva, and S. O. Murray, “Attention to bright surfaces enhances the pupillary light reflex,” The Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 33, no. 5, pp. 2199–2204, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. S. Mathôt, L. van der Linden, J. Grainger, and F. Vitu, “The pupillary light response reveals the focus of covert visual attention,” PLoS ONE, vol. 8, no. 10, Article ID e78168, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  44. M. Naber, G. A. Alvarez, and K. Nakayama, “Tracking the allocation of attention using human pupillary oscillations,” Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 4, article 919, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  45. P. Binda and S. O. Murray, “Spatial attention increases the pupillary response to light changes,” Journal of Vision, vol. 15, no. 2, article 1, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  46. P. Binda and S. O. Murray, “Keeping a large-pupilled eye on high-level visual processing,” Trends in Cognitive Sciences, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 1–3, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  47. A. Benedetto and P. Binda, “Dissociable saccadic suppression of pupillary and perceptual responses to light,” Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 115, no. 3, pp. 1243–1251, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  48. M. Lorber, B. L. Zuber, and L. Stark, “Suppression of the pupillary light reflex in binocular rivalry and saccadic suppression,” Nature, vol. 208, no. 5010, pp. 558–560, 1965. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  49. C. Lunghi and A. Sale, “A cycling lane for brain rewiring,” Current Biology, vol. 25, no. 23, pp. R1122–R1123, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  50. F. W. Cornelissen, E. M. Peters, and J. Palmer, “The Eyelink Toolbox: eye tracking with MATLAB and the Psychophysics Toolbox,” Behavior Research Methods, Instruments, & Computers, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 613–617, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. R. N. Raveendran, R. J. Babu, R. F. Hess, and W. R. Bobier, “Transient improvements in fixational stability in strabismic amblyopes following bifoveal fixation and reduced interocular suppression,” Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, vol. 34, no. 2, pp. 214–225, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  52. C.-A. Wang, D. C. Brien, and D. P. Munoz, “Pupil size reveals preparatory processes in the generation of pro-saccades and anti-saccades,” European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 41, no. 8, pp. 1102–1110, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  53. J. Ross and A. Ma-Wyatt, “Saccades actively maintain perceptual continuity,” Nature Neuroscience, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 65–69, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. R. L. van den Brink, P. R. Murphy, and S. Nieuwenhuis, “Pupil diameter tracks lapses of attention,” PLoS ONE, vol. 11, no. 10, Article ID e0165274, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  55. M. C. Koss, T. Gherezghiher, and A. Nomura, “CNS adrenergic inhibition of parasympathetic oculomotor tone,” Journal of the Autonomic Nervous System, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 55–68, 1984. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. M. Kaneko and M. P. Stryker, “Sensory experience during locomotion promotes recovery of function in adult visual cortex,” eLife, vol. 3, Article ID e02798, 2014. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. J. Zhou, B. Thompson, and R. F. Hess, “A new form of rapid binocular plasticity in adult with amblyopia,” Scientific Reports, vol. 3, article 2638, 2013. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  58. C. Lunghi, M. C. Morrone, J. Secci, and R. Caputo, “Binocular rivalry measured 2 hours after occlusion therapy predicts the recovery rate of the amblyopic eye in anisometropic children,” Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, vol. 57, no. 4, pp. 1537–1546, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus