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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7260130, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7260130
Review Article

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor, Depression, and Physical Activity: Making the Neuroplastic Connection

Department of Physical Therapy, A-State, Jonesboro, AR, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Cristy Phillips; ude.etatsa@spillihpc

Received 14 April 2017; Accepted 18 July 2017; Published 8 August 2017

Academic Editor: Frank S. Hall

Copyright © 2017 Cristy Phillips. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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