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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 7282834, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7282834
Research Article

Long-Term High Salt Intake Involves Reduced SK Currents and Increased Excitability of PVN Neurons with Projections to the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla in Rats

1Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931, USA
2Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Science, Jilin Normal University, Siping, Jilin 136000, China
3Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Qing-Hui Chen; ude.utm@ciuhgniq

Received 19 July 2017; Accepted 11 September 2017; Published 6 December 2017

Academic Editor: Depei Li

Copyright © 2017 Andrew D. Chapp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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