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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2017, Article ID 8696402, 9 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/8696402
Research Article

Acupuncture Attenuates Renal Sympathetic Activity and Blood Pressure via Beta-Adrenergic Receptors in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

1Acupuncture and Moxibustion Department, Beijing Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 23 Meishuguanhou Street, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100010, China
2Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, 11 Beisanhuan East Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100029, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Cun-Zhi Liu; moc.621@087326zcl

Received 8 August 2016; Accepted 11 January 2017; Published 8 February 2017

Academic Editor: Preston E. Garraghty

Copyright © 2017 Jing-Wen Yang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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