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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 1237962, 14 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1237962
Research Article

Anodal tDCS over Primary Motor Cortex Provides No Advantage to Learning Motor Sequences via Observation

1Social Brain in Action Laboratory, Wales Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, School of Psychology, Bangor University, Wales, UK
2MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK
3Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, School of Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK

Correspondence should be addressed to Richard Ramsey; ku.ca.rognab@yesmar.r and Emily S. Cross; ku.ca.wogsalg@ssorc.ylime

Received 27 October 2017; Accepted 28 December 2017; Published 29 March 2018

Academic Editor: Nicole Wenderoth

Copyright © 2018 Dace Apšvalka et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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