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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 1824713, 15 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/1824713
Review Article

Roles of Gasotransmitters in Synaptic Plasticity and Neuropsychiatric Conditions

1Department of Biomedical Science, Graduate School, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea
2Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, College of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea
3Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Applied Science, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17104, Republic of Korea
4Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, Dong-A University, 32 Daesingongwon-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49201, Republic of Korea
5East-West Medical Research Institute, Kyung Hee University, 26 Kyungheedae-ro, Dongdaemun-gu, 13 Seoul 02447, Republic of Korea

Correspondence should be addressed to Junyang Jung; rk.ca.uhk@gnujj

Received 4 January 2018; Revised 25 February 2018; Accepted 11 March 2018; Published 6 May 2018

Academic Editor: Steven W. Johnson

Copyright © 2018 Ulfuara Shefa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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