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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018, Article ID 3281040, 7 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3281040
Research Article

Examination Stress Results in Attentional Bias and Altered Neural Reactivity in Test-Anxious Individuals

1Research Center for Learning Science, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China
2School of Psychology, Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210023, China
3School of Education, Jiangsu University of Technology, Changzhou 213001, China
4Department of Psychology, School of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023, China
5National Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Renlai Zhou; nc.ude.ujn@uohzlr

Received 6 December 2017; Accepted 28 January 2018; Published 20 March 2018

Academic Editor: Jason H. Huang

Copyright © 2018 Xiaocong Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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