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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2018 (2018), Article ID 3678534, 10 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/3678534
Research Article

Age of Insomnia Onset Correlates with a Reversal of Default Mode Network and Supplementary Motor Cortex Connectivity

1Siena Brain Investigation & Neuromodulation Lab (Si-BIN Lab), Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology Section, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
2Berenson-Allen Center for Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
3Center for Sleep Medicine, “Le Scotte” Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, Italy
4Department of Medicine, Surgery and Neuroscience, University of Siena School of Medicine, Siena, Italy
5Laboratory of Psychophysiology, Chair of Psychiatry, Department of Systems Medicine, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy
6Psychiatry and Clinical Psychology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Fondazione Policlinico “Tor Vergata”, Rome, Italy

Correspondence should be addressed to Emiliano Santarnecchi; ude.dravrah.cmdib@nratnase

Received 17 July 2017; Revised 14 February 2018; Accepted 6 March 2018; Published 1 April 2018

Academic Editor: Stuart C. Mangel

Copyright © 2018 Emiliano Santarnecchi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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